Adam Jeppesen Book Launch & Artist's Talk

27 November 2019

Black Box Projects Presents

 

Adam Jeppesen’s Error, Object, Structure

Book Launch and Artist’s Talk

at

The Photographers’ Gallery Bookshop

16 – 18 Ramillies Street, London W1F 7LW

 

Wednesday 27 November 2019, 6.30-8.30 pm

RSVP essential: info@blackboxprojects.art

 

Black Box Projects is pleased to present the U.K. launch of Error, Object, Structure at The Photographers’ Gallery Bookshop on 27 November 2019. This new publication includes more than a decade’s work by Adam Jeppesen – from the epic photographic journey of the Flatlands Camp Project of 2009 to the more recent monumental sculptural installation The Great Filter in 2019, which is currently on exhibition at Brandts Museum of Art and Visual Culture, Denmark. The book contains 63 colour plates from various series and projects with accompanying text contributions from Catherine Toriano (V&A), Sarah Allen (Tate Modern), Hinde Haest (Foam), Søren Gosvig Olesen (Univ. of Copenhagen), Mads Damsbo (Brandts), Leonard Koren (author of Wabi-Sabi: for Artists, Designers, Poets and Philosophers, 1994 and Wabi-Sabi: Further Thoughts, 2015).

 

The artist will give a talk at 7pm about his practice, the publication and forthcoming exhibitions.

Publication Specs:

Linen bound, printed cover

Edition of 1500 copies

160 pages

21 x 27 cm format

Munken Lynx 170 g

Printed by Narayana Press ( DK)

Published by Plethora Magazine, 2019

 

Retail price: £45

 

Error, Object, Structure was made in close collaboration with: 

Black Box Projects, London 

Brandts-Museum of Art and Visual Culture, Odense 

Martin Asbæk Gallery, Copenhagen 

Bendana Pinel Art Contemporain, Paris

 

 

Adam Jeppesen (Denmark, lives in Argentina) creates work that addresses the materiality and transience of the photograph as an object. Much of Jeppesen's work is the result of a solitary 487-day journey from the North Pole to Antarctica in 2009 called The Flatlands Camp Project. The journey has left visible traces and blemishes on the photographs as he carried his film and camera equipment with him on the road, where the negatives picked up grit and dust along the way. Jeppesen celebrates these imperfect elements rather than tries to hide them. Coincidence, damage and imperfection are essential elements in his work. At a time when the image has become infinitely perfectible and reproducible, Jeppesen experiments with the photograph as a unique object that is subject to the forces of change and decay.